Formerly a salt panning community on the banks of the river Forth, the first panning was undertaken by the monks of Kennetpans Abbey thought to have closed during the reformation c1520s.

In medieval times salt was mainly used for preserving food for the winter months. The salt was obtained by evaporating sea water in large cast iron pans over coal fired furnaces. The practice continued in the local area until the late 18th century. 

At one time there were 35 salt pans in existence between Kennetpans, Kincardine and Culross (Kincardine used to be known as West Pans). This had decreased in number to 23 by 1750. The panning industry was only made possible in this area by its close proximity to some of Scotland's earliest coal pits, Kennetpans being one.

 

 

Experts Comments

“Kennetpans is an important site in the Historic development of the whisky industry, and for something to survive since 18th century and being an early forerunner in the industrial revolution of Scotland, I agree it should be saved.”

Alan Winchester
Whisky Historian
Master Distiller The Glenlivet Distilleries